Who We Are

The Association of Independent LSCB Chairs (AILC) is the national membership organisation for Independent Chairs of Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs). It was set up in 2012 with the aim of ensuring that the voice and substantial experience of Independent LSCB Chairs would be heard more effectively so as to improve the effectiveness of LSCBs and promote better outcomes for children and young people through the multi-agency child protection system.

It began as an informal network of LSCB Chairs; then receiving a small amount of Government funding to enable the formalisation of the network and is now funded by the fees received by individual Chair membership and the grant contributions from LSCB partnerships. Additional funding continues to be sought from government and other sources to assist in achieving common objectives in safeguarding. 

The primary focus of the Association is on safeguarding in England; both the Chairs and the LSCB Partnerships in England are encouraged to join AILC in achieving its objectives.   Chairs from other parts of Great Britain are also welcome as members (and currently are represented in Wales, Isle of Man, Jersey & Guernsey).   For more information on membership go to Membership Benefits.

 For Chairs to Join & for Partnerships to Join.

What We Do

The Association works with a broad range of statutory and voluntary organisations. It includes the provision of consultation on specific issues, responding to formal consultations, providing speakers for events, sharing specific work projects and promoting learning from a variety of sources which will support the work of LSCBs. For simplicity, our operational efforts can be divided into two, Internal and External focused efforts:


Internal efforts covers our Policy focus on LSCB Effectiveness, Serious Case Reviews, LSCB Annual Reports, Improvement & Inspection (including regular Ofsted Analysis), Related LSCB Guidance & Resources and Innovation works; It also covers a Continued Professional Development Programme for Independent LSCB Chairs and is developing CPD for Business/Board Managers.


External efforts covers our Public Affairs focus; where we build and develop relations between Government and key stakeholders through AILC Consultations & Commissions, AILC Briefings and our coordinated efforts to inform and influence the Government's review of LSCBs. 

Vision & Aims

The Vision of the Association of Independent LSCB Chairs is to improve the safeguarding outcomes for children, through supporting and strengthening Independent Chairs and LSCB partnerships.

The Aims are:

  • Improving the effectiveness of LSCBs through shared learning, peer support and challenge
  • Providing a forum through which the insights and views of independent LSCB Chairs can be disseminated in order to improve the wellbeing of vulnerable children
  • Acting as a national voice for Chairs, giving an informed response to government consultations and seeking to influence and respond to other policy development proposals on LSCB related safeguarding issues
  • Supporting the professional development of independent LSCB Chairs to undertake their statutory role
  • Leading on LSCB matters in partnership with other safeguarding organisations
  • Enhancing the contribution of independence in the chairing of LSCBs
  • Strengthening the identity of LSCBs in local, regional and national governance structures

Key Propositions

Strong, effective multi-agency safeguarding arrangements do not just happen - they demand an active commitment to collaboration and common purpose. This can be in tension with other organisational and policy objectives:  agencies have different authorising environments, but must share a common purpose for their joint safeguarding work. Effective protection of children and the promotion of their well-being can only be secured through working together. Therefore, safeguarding arrangements for children and young people have to be built, sustained, tested and continuously improved.

Safeguarding arrangements and practice must:

  • Champion the interests and rights of children and young people
  • Provide the independent challenge and leadership that is essential to ensure the best outcomes for children amidst competing priorities
  • Involve all partners, not just police, health and the local authority, with sanctions and a clear duty to co-operate
  • Scrutinise and improve practice - using a range of approaches and meaningful measures (e.g. Section 11, audits, data, case reviews, feedback from children, families and practitioners and Annual Reports) to provide accountable oversight and feedback on performance and outcomes
  • Learn from experience and evidence of what works well – creating workable strategic and operational arrangements that fit form to function and are proportionate, efficient, effective and adequately resourced
  • Meet the leadership challenge of harnessing multiple partners to achieve common goals

To achieve these propositions the Association has suggested some starting points:

  • Independent Chairs should take the lead to initiate the refocusing of local effort on scrutiny, challenge and quality assurance
  • Consider retaining tried and tested frameworks for multi-agency safeguarding - only replace existing partnerships where these are effective with something better
  • Regional and sub-regional groups should develop change proposals based on the propositions outlined above
  • Develop a competency framework and development programme for independent safeguarding leaders
  • The need to highlight and mitigate the risks to expertise, resource, capacity, relationships and skills that may be lost through any transition period
  • Ensure that new arrangements for safeguarding practice reviews are focused on timely learning which brings about improvement in practice

Starting Points for Delivering our Vision

  • Independent Chairs should take the lead to initiate the refocusing of local effort on scrutiny, challenge and quality assurance

  • Consider retaining tried and tested frameworks for multi-agency safeguarding - only replace existing partnerships where these are effective with something better

  • Develop regional and sub-regional change proposals based on the propositions outlined above

  • Develop a competency framework and development programme for independent safeguarding leaders

  • Highlight and mitigate the risks to expertise, resource, capacity, relationships and skills that may be lost through any transition period

  • Ensure that new arrangements for safeguarding practice reviews are focused on timely learning which brings about improvement in practice